Computer Technician Loves Keeping Students and Staff Wired at Truman

Computer technician Juan Rodriguez gets an inside look at a laptop, to try and figure out what's wrong.

Computer technician Juan Rodriguez gets an inside look at a laptop, to try and figure out what’s wrong.

BRONX, NY – Sometimes, when you find your calling in life, you just “know.”  Maintaining a 7-story building’s information technology infrastructure is no easy job, but it’s one that technician Juan Rodriguez is ready to take on every day.

“Ever since I touched a computer I have been in love with computers,” Rodriguez says.  “God gave me the skills and the talent to learn everything that I know and I’m really good at it.”

Rodriguez maintains 12 computer labs and all teacher and staff systems throughout the building.

Rodriguez maintains 12 computer labs and all teacher and staff systems throughout the building.

When he’s not maintaining 12 computer labs and hundreds of smartboards, Rodriguez says he does get the occasional chance to interact with Truman’s students.

“They interact with me, they always like to talk to me,” he says.  Rodriguez is currently teaching students in Spanish class how to record themselves using the application, “Audacity,” a task they will have to do later for an examination.  “I just love interacting with them, because I feel like I’m their age.”

The Stevenson High School graduate and Bronx native originally went to college for electrical engineering, a job that his father also did.

“It was a mistake because I should have went for computers.”

Rodriguez gets another computer lab ready for the next incoming class.

Rodriguez gets another computer lab ready for the next incoming class.

Realizing it wasn’t for him, Rodriguez dropped out and pursued other work.  After several corporate jobs, he ended up working for Dell, who, at the time, was the New York City Department of Education’s contracted computer vendor.  A later job with ASI Systems led him to Truman, where he was recommended by the school’s past IT technician.  He says he loves working in the school.

“I love it.  Everybody here is friendly.  Everybody looks out for each other.  It’s just wonderful working here,” according to Rodriguez.

Every day is unpredictable.  What starts off as a slow day can turn very hectic with just a few requests from teachers to fix a smartboard, borrow a laptop, or figure out why a printer will not print.

“Just when you least expect it, I might be busy the whole day.”

 

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